What’s Stuck In My Head – 31 July

10CC…  What comes to mind when you hear that?  A measurement of volume (10 Cubic Centimeters – although Milliliters is a better term), or maybe, for techies a Carbon Copy on an email send to 10 addresses?  Well, in this case, I’m referring to the English “art” band, 10cc.

I won’t use their two American airplay hits, “I’m Not In Love”, (from the 1975 album The Original Soundtrack) or from the 1976 album Deceptive Bends, “The Things We Do For Love”.  Both are excellent songs with “I’m Not In Love” reaching number one in the UK and number 2 in the US, and “The Things We Do For Love” making it to number 6 and number 5 as well.

10cc is an English rock band formed in StockportGreater Manchester in 1972. It initially consisted of four musicians – Graham GouldmanEric StewartKevin Godley and Lol Creme – who had written and recorded together since 1968. The group featured two songwriting teams. Stewart and Gouldman were predominantly pop songwriters, who created most of the band’s accessible songs. By contrast, Godley and Creme were the predominantly experimental half of 10cc, featuring art and cinematically-inspired writing.

Every member of 10cc was a multi-instrumentalist, singer, writer and producer. Most of the band’s records were recorded at their own Strawberry Studios (North) in Stockport and Strawberry Studios (South) in Dorking, with most of those engineered by Stewart.

From 1972 to 1978, 10cc had five consecutive UK top-ten albums: Sheet MusicThe Original Soundtrack (1975), How Dare You! (1976), Deceptive Bends (1977) and Bloody Tourists (1978). They also had twelve singles reach the UK Top 40, three of which were the chart-toppers “Rubber Bullets” (1973), “I’m Not in Love” (1975) and “Dreadlock Holiday” (1978). “I’m Not in Love” was their breakthrough worldwide hit and is known for its innovative backing track. Godley and Creme quit the band in 1976 due to artistic disagreements and became a duo act. Stewart left the band in 1995. Since 1999, Gouldman has led a touring version of 10cc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10cc

Gouldman was also an amazing writer penning such hits as “Heart Full of Soul” and “For Your Love” for The Yardbirds, as well as “Look Through Any Window” and “Bus Stop” for The Hollies.

For today’s entry I’m going with “Dreadlock Holiday”, a wonderful track that didn’t get much airplay in America because as Gouldman says;

When asked why he thought the song didn’t do better in the US, Gouldman said that reportedly some radio stations would not play reggae of any kind.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadlock_Holiday

I always enjoy it more when the song is based on an actual event;

The song was based on real events Eric Stewart and Moody Blues vocalist Justin Hayward experienced in Barbados. Stewart changed the location to JamaicaGraham Gouldman commented: “Some of the experiences that are mentioned are true, and some of them are … fairly true!”[3][4] Stewart recalled seeing a white guy “trying to be cool and he looked so naff” walking into a group of Afro-Caribbeans and being reprimanded, which became the lyric “Don’t you walk through my words, you got to show some respect.” Another lyric came from a conversation Gouldman had with a Jamaican, who when asked if he liked cricket replied, “No, I love it!”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadlock_Holiday

While this catchy reggae rhythm is what’s stuck today, I also recommend their 8+ minute opus “Une Nuit A Paris (One Night in Paris)” also from the Original Soundtrack album. But I have to ask what exactly that album was a soundtrack for….

And I’m not going to get into other meanings of the band’s name. See also: The Loving Spoonful. I seem to remember another band name or song title along this line, but it won’t come to mind right now. Leave a comment below if you know of others that fit!

Enjoy!

Peace,
B

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