Photographs

Scotland 2019 -Day 2

Reference Map

Today we left Glasgow and headed north to Loch Lomond and Inverary. The weather exactly what we expected. Chilly (right around 52° F) and damp. We overheard someone that they needed an umbrella because it was “pouring”. It was barely drizzling. Guess this person has ever been out in a #Floriduh summer shower.

First up was a stop and boat ride on Loch Lomond. Loch Lomand is the largest fresh body of water in Britain. The water was very quiet today.

Our boat was the Lomond Queen.

Then just a short trip to the town of Inveraray, a quaint town on the shores of Loch Fyne. We spent about two hours in town shopping and having lunch.

Wifey standing on Main Street in Inveraray. Several shops and restaurants line both sides.

Our lunch source.

After lunch it was time for Inveraray Castle. As I’ve mentioned before, this is not actually a castle, it is a manor house. Why? Because the Duke of Argyll has this as his family home. We were hoping that His Grace would be home, but he wasn’t. He has a batten (Maybe a baton? Our tour guide has a very thick brogue) of office in his role of Master of the Royal Household in Scotland. And it was “missing”. Our guide in the castle ensured us it was not stolen, but His Grace will take it without notice if he needs it in the performance of his duties.

Then the absolute highlight of the day, maybe the year, maybe even of my life occurred. Our tour guide Ian had a bit of surprise in store. You see, the route from Inveraray to our nexr stop, Glen Coe, passes right by a very special place for me.

I’ve mentioned this castle before and I’ve posted some other folks pictures. But today I got see it with my own eyes. We didn’t get to go up to the castle, just see it from a wayside stop. But here is my picture (one of several) of Kilchurn, one of the ancestral homes of Clan Campbell. Oh, and it’s pronounced Kill-kern. Not like it looks, Kill-churn. I’ve been saying it wrong for years sadly. Now I know better. Thank you, Ian for teaching me this.

From there we continued north into the highlands and (drum roll please) Glen Coe. The Campbell’s have a history with this Glen. I won’t go through it here, as it’s very complicated. If you don’t know the story, here is a Wikipedia link.

On the way to our hotel we got to see the Three Sisters of Glen Coe. II took a panoramic shot to get all three of the sisters in the shot. I hope it works for this format.

Finally we made it our hotel. This little place is way much better than the Hilton we stayed in last night.

They even have a small circle of standing stones on the property.

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So that’s it for tonight. As long as the MacDonald ghosts don’t come after this lone Campbell, I will be back with more tomorrow. And when you add that they find Argyll’s batten missing today, AND I’m deep into Glen Coe, I can’t help thinking I’m being set up!

Our itinerary for tomorrow is the Isle of Skye.

Peace,

B

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Oh yeah, I had haggis at breakfast – and I liked it!

Random Photographs

Just a few photos of our random life. And I promise, no pictures of food (my older brother laughs at me for posting pictures of my food. But there’s lots of that on my Instagram – link at the bottom of the post).

My early morning crack genealogy crew! Animaniacs Forever!!!
Baron von LardAss hanging out in my beatup truck. Please note the beer and bluetooth speaker blaring the tunes. A typical Sunday afternoon.
A small muder of crows carousing in the road. At any given time there will be three times this number in the area.
The granddaughters striking a pose at Castillo de San Marcos, St. Augustine.
A foggy morning in the backyard.

All pictures were taken on my Google Pixel 3XL cellphone. Only the first picture uses the “Night Sight” option, all others were a simple point and shoot.

Hope you enjoyed these. Post some of your photos in a comment!

Peace,
B

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A Week Of Birthdays

I’m guessing that this was quite the week back in the day.

Yesterday would have been my paternal grandmother’s 134th birthday. Josephine “Nanny” Bodle was born 27 March 1885. Nanny lived with us for most of my childhood. She is where I get my love of cooking. She ran her own BBQ resturant in Altoona, Pennsylvania.

Josie maybe 1900?

Today is my father’s birthday, Donald Campbell would have been 107. Dad was born 28 March 1912. He was a pretty remarkable guy. We had our differences, but then what kid doesn’t have issues with their parents at some point?

Donald Campbell maybe 1930?

And then to complete the trifecta, my paternal grandfather’s 135th birthday would have been on Sunday. Herbert J. Campbell born 31 March 1884, and died 5 February 1919, a victim of the flu pandemic.

Herbert J. Campbell 1905

I can only imagine how this week was celebrated in my Campbell ancestor’s house. I love the convergence of my father and his parents birthdays all together in one week.

And a Happy Birthday to anyone that has a birthday this week! You’re in good company.

Peace,
B

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Chipping Away At That Wall

I have been working very hard on my genealogy again. While I do have a very good lead on that ever elusive “immigrant ancestor”, I have still been looking for more information on my father’s first wife.

I have now proven that the lovely lady I mentioned in this post, is in fact Trudie. I used Facebook, of all things to get the needed info.

Using the Blair County, Pennsylvania, Genealogy Society Facebook page, I found the email for their research assistant, Patti. She was ever so helpful. For a small donation to the society, she found Don & Trudie’s marriage documents.

Marriage certificate for Donald Campbell and Mary Gertrude Lyman.

Not only did she find the certificate, she found the application as well.

Marriage application

Now being the nosey guy that I am, I couldn’t help but wonder where did the ceremony take place? Was it in a church, the city office, where? The first step was to figure out who the Thos. W. Kelley was that performed the actual ceremony was. My oldest sister remembers dad saying that Trudie was Catholic. My new friend Patti was able to locate a Father Thomas W. Kelley that was listed in several other marriages at St. Therese’s Catholic church in Altoona. And on the scan of the city record book, it lists Fr. Kelley as “Priest”.

Now that I knew they were married in the Catholic tradition, if not in a Catholic church building, a big question popped into my pointy head. Did my dad have to convert or at least sign a statement of some kind that he would convert to Catholisim? This is a very common thing with many of the world’s religions.

So, with the help of my other friend, Google, I was able to locate St. Therese’s church in Altoona. They don’t have a website, but they do have an email. After much pondering, moreover what to ask, than if I should even send an email, I sent an email asking if they had any records of the marriage and if my dad had to make any kind of conversion promise.

Lo and behold, this was the answer I received;


Dear Mr. Campbell, 
The marriage of Donald Sherwood Campbell and Mary Gertrude Lyman took place at St. Therese Parish, whether in the Church or at the Rectory is unknown.  Mary was a member of St. Leo’s Parish, and received the permission from Fr. O’Connell for the marriage to take place at St. Therese.  The records shows that the couple received a dispensation for Mixed Religion.  And that indicates that Donald was still a Protestant at the time of the wedding.  Mary would have signed a document promising to raise any children Catholic to the best of their ability and that this marriage would not endanger her faith.  Father Kelley would have informed Donald that Mary made these promises.  
During the day of Bishop Guilfoyle, he was strict about non-Catholics marrying Catholics wanting the non-Catholics to convert.  However the Bishop seems to have signed the dispensation.  
Documents are sparse.  We have only the granted dispensations and the record in the registry.  I hope this helps.   If Donald became Catholic it was after his marriage.

Sincerely,
Fr. D. Timothy Grimme
Pastor

Pretty cool. I could cross this off my genealogical to-do list. The next step in my search on Trudie is to find a cause of death. I have requested a death certificate from the folks in Washington, D.C. but have not received anything back.

It is interesting that her name is listed as Mary Gertrude. I understand the use of Mary, as it is normal, if not required, to use a saint’s name in the Catholic tradition. The odd thing is that every other record I have of her lists her as Gertrude M., the names are reversed. Even in early records such as the 1920 census when she’s still with her parents, she’s listed as Gertrude. Oh well. I’ve seen odder things.

Mary Gertrude “Trudie” and Donald Sherwood Campbell.

I really do wish I had a date for that picture. Love the pencil thin mustache my dad’s sporting!

Peace,
B

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Samhain 2018

(Last year’s Samhain and Allhallow’s Eve posts)

It’s both a joy and a hindrance growing up and now living in Florida. The seasons don’t really change. The calendar changes just like everybody else’s, but that’s the only way to know which holiday to celebrate. Yes, we get our 12 hours of autumn, and maybe four days of winter, but other than love bug season the rest of the year it’s the same. It was nice to get bicycles and skates for Christmas because we could use them right away. We didn’t have to wait for the spring thaw. I spent many Christmas afternoons outside on my bike, skates, playing with whichever piece of sports gear I got that year. No bundling up, hell I seldom wore a shirt or shoes!  Brag all you want about winter sports. We spent two years in Alaska. You can keep all your skis, snowmobiles, and hockey gear.  Not for me.

With my birthday falling during Thanksgiving week (no, I was not born on a Thanksgiving day. I am not a Turkey. I was born on a Tuesday), that holiday holds great importance to me. Except for the year I turned 18. That was on a Thanksgiving day. But I was at Lackland Air Force Base, in basic training, pulling KP duty. So that year it basically sucked.

One thing that has bothered me for years now is the “holiday creep”.  It really pisses me off when I go into a store before November and they have Christmas decorations already up. Let’s give all the holidays their proper time.

That would make Samhain/Halloween/Allhallow’s Eve first.

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The girl’s Jack O’Lanterns for this year

Again this year, trick or treating falls in the middle of the week, so we had to take the

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A map of the corn maze. We didn’t get lost, but we didn’t do the entire maze either. Somehow we skipped about a quarter of it!

girls out for fun early.  We hit up a “Fall Festival” with a corn maze, games, food, and other typical events. Despite the heat, it was quite fun. The girls had two of their younger cousins come along, so the adults didn’t have to be with them all the time. We just had to keep them in sight.

We also took the girls to a local church’s festive events.  We got there a bit late, but there really wasn’t much to do anyway. Both the girls did the “box maze” (you had to crawl through large boxes that were placed together. It was more of a tunnel than a maze). Granddaughter-the-elder spent her time on the big inflatable slides.  Her costume was one of the characters from Disney’s Descendants 2 show. Don’t ask me which one. Maybe you can tell from the picture. But her costume was so slippery she beat all the boys down the slides every time. They said she was cheating!

Granddaughter-the-younger (costume from the same show) spent her entire time waiting in line to get her face painted. She didn’t seem to mind (don’t think she was feeling well anyway), so I’m not complaining.  I just sat on a chair off to the side where I could see everything. But the music!  So bad! They’d blast some pop tune all the kids all knew followed by a Christian song that had no relevance to the event. Sheesh..

And of course, we carved the Jack O’Lantern’s you saw above.

Tomorrow the veil thins, and travel between the realms is easier. At least that’s what some believe. It may well be true. Having never been dead, I don’t know what it takes to cross over. But last year’s posts have more info (they’re linked at the top of the page).

There aren’t many kids in our neighborhood, although some families are moving in as us old folks die off, so Wifey® and I usually don’t stay home on trick or treating night. We’ve found that even leaving all the lights out in the front of the house doesn’t stop the most determined hoodlums’ kids from banging on the door and screaming for candy.  In the past that made the dogs go crazy. But sadly, the dogs have passed on so that won’t be a problem.*

I used to dress up in costume and hand out candy and /or go to parties. But not anymore. If my granddaughters were available during the week and not just on weekends, I would do it again. Way back in the day I would drag my sound system out to the front porch and blast Rick Wakeman’s The Six Wives of Henry VIII at a very loud volume while my bud Mo and I would do our best to scare the kids trying to steal our candy. But, alas, those days are past.

Check out my friend Kirsten’s blog Once Upon A Spine. She still has the spirit.

crop clown makeup.jpg

I don’t even wear my clown face anymore…

Peace,
B

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* Wouldn’t it be a hoot if the dogs and cat we lost last year crossed over and visited us??

Another Brick Falls

If you’ve been following along with my genealogy posts ( here’s one, and another), you know that I’m not having the best of luck running down my Campbell name.  So this week I took a break from looking for that elusive “immigrant ancestor” and tried my hand at a different brick wall.

My dad had a first wife. All I ever heard about her was the name “Trudie”. No last name, not even if Trudie was a nickname or not, but I have always gone on the notion that her name was Gertrude. But since I am the baby of my family, my older siblings had a little more knowledge than I. I did some searching via Ancestry, Fold3, Archives, and Newspapers.  All of those sites have different aspects that making internet search a bit easier.

I do remember finding a newspaper clipping of my father when he worked for Fairchild Airmotive during WWII era. The article was just a profile of him and his job, but it closed with a tantalizing clue. As best I can recall it said: “he and his wife live in Graham.” I asked my mom if she had ever lived in a town called Graham and she said no. I’m not positive, but I believe Graham is near Burlington, NC. I did find two clippings from The Daily Times which was Burlington’s newspaper of the era, that mention a Don and Gertrude Campbell.  Both of these clippings are from the 1943/1944 years, which is exactly the correct time frame for dad to be there.

I also found a Donald and Gertrude Campbell in the 1940 census living in Altoona, Pennsylvania. Now dad is a native of Pennsylvania, and my oldest sister was born in Altoona, so this was a promising find. On the 1940 census, one of the questions asked was where the person lived in 1935. Both Don and Gertrude answered “same place”. So I looked up city directories for Altoona in 1935. For those that have never heard of a “city

outside of campbell restaurant 3

directory” basically it’s the forerunner of a telephone book.  I could not find Don listed in the 1935 directory, but I do find him, with his mother, in the 1930 census in Antis
Township, Pennsylvania, which is in the same county as Altoona. I do find Don in the 1936 census in Tipton (maybe a suburb of Altoona?). I’m positive this is the correct Don as it has him listed as working in his mother’s restaurant.

Then I found a WWII draft card for Don. I know dad was “4-F” (medically unfit for service), so I was interested in this record.  Ancestry only gave his name and a few other tidbits of information. Just enough that I could say it was his record, but nothing more. The Fold3 site has lots and lots of military records. There I could see the entire card. And it was golden. It gives the same address as the 1940 census! So that was the correct couple. Sadly, they used the standard naming conventions of the times. For the emergency contact person, all it has is Mrs Don S. Campbell. Arrgghhh!!! Why didn’t they use their own names? I see so many old records like this. It is so frustrating.

Check out all the addresses crossed out. I’m not sure how to interpret that.

Family history says that Trudie died early in the marriage, for unknown to us reasons, and that dad married our mom very quickly after her passing.  By pure luck, I came across an obituary from the Altoona Mirror, dated 10 July 1945 for a Gertrude Campbell, with a spouse Donald Campbell. But it’s for Gertrude’s death in Washington D.C. Wait, what?? In DC? But then I remembered that mom and dad did meet in DC. And the death date is only seven months prior to mom and dad getting married. Which fits the family stories perfectly.

Gertrude M Campbell 07-10-1945-page-001

From the 10 July 1945 Altoona Mirror

One stumbling block I still have is I cannot find any marriage records for Don and Gertrude, nor a death certificate for Gertrude. Since her death was in 1945, she should be listed in the Social Security Death Index as the event occurred about ten years after Social Security was started. But she may not have had a social security number. I have no idea as to how long it took for social numbers to become “standard”.

So, yes, genealogy still sucks. But I have, finally, partially knocked down one brick wall.  I wonder which will be next!

So, what are your genealogy brick walls??

Peace,
B

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7 Day B&W Photo Challenge – Day 7

outside of campbell restaurant 3

I was challenged by Kirsten over at Once Upon A Spine to do the “7 Day Black and White Photo Challenge”, and I’m always up for a challenge. The rules are simple: Seven days. Seven black and white photos of your life. No people. No explanation. Challenge someone new each day.

Since I never tend to follow directions I’m going to comment on my selections for this challenge. First, the “no people” requirement made it very difficult for me. As you can tell, all the photos I’ve used are old photos that I’ve scanned in to add to various genealogy projects. I have some wonderful old photographs of family members dating back to the early 1900’s. But I couldn’t use them for this challenge. What a shame. Maybe I’ll use some for another post.

Day one is a picture taken by my father of the beach at Matheson Hammock in Miami, Florida. My family (and Wifey’s®) grew up on this beach. My dad was a pretty good amateur photographer. He had some of his work of Hurricane Donna damage (1960) picked by the Associated Press and United Press International.

Day two is the “Campbell House – Milesburg, PA”. Yes, there are people in it, but they’re not the focus of the shot, and it’s not really a B&W – more of a sepia, but I used it anyway. The 1930 census lists my paternal grandmother as a “boarding house owner”. I think this is that house, but I am not sure. And I have no idea who the people sitting on the porch are.

Day three is a winter shot of my mother’s house in Gaston, SC, where she moved after my father passed. It may not be a true black and white, but I always thought it was a striking photo, so I used it. Plus it’s one of my favorites that I actually took!

Day four is, according to the note on the back, a picture of Shep. Shep was my dad’s dog way before my siblings and I were around. The location is unknown.

Day five shows my brother’s, Chevy Nova. I’m not sure of the year, but the house I grew up in is in the background so it had to be after 1960.

Day 6 has a very interesting note on the back; “This is where the cookies come from – Friend’s Union State College, PA.” My paternal grandmother, “Nanny”, told me many times that she was the first cook hired by Penn State University. I have a letter from the Civil Engineering Camp of the Penn State Univ. accepting Josephine as Head Cook for the school camp demonstration project, dated 9/20/1956. The demonstration project ran from 9/30 through 10/12 of the same year. Along with many pictures of her in the kitchen of this building cooking up a storm.

And finally, Day 7. Just to show how good a cook Nanny was, this is a picture of her BBQ restaurant. All I know is that it was somewhere in Pennsylvania. And you see that I come by my love of all things grilled naturally.

This is a picture of the inside of her restaurant:

inside of campbell restaurant mirrored

I love the “Open Kitchen”. Same way I run mine.

Today I’ll nominate: Little Fears

I want to thank Kiersten again for tagging me in this project. And a big hearty Welcome! to all my new followers. Hope I can continue to earn your support.

Peace,
B

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7 Day B&W Photo Challenge – Day 6

Friends union penn state univ

I was challenged by Kirsten over at Once Upon A Spine to do the “7 Day Black and White Photo Challenge”, and I’m always up for a challenge. The rules are simple: Seven days. Seven black and white photos of your life. No people. No explanation. Challenge someone new each day.

Today I’ll nominate: Divine Minds

Peace,
B

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7 Day B&W Photo Challenge – Day 5

terrys nova at 29th st

I was challenged by Kirsten over at Once Upon A Spine to do the “7 Day Black and White Photo Challenge”, and I’m always up for a challenge.  The rules are simple: Seven days. Seven black and white photos of your life. No people. No explanation. Challenge someone new each day.

Today I’ll nominate: YummyHood

Peace,
B

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Gibson Girl

The idea for this post came out of the “7 Day B&W Photo Challenge” that my lovely friend Kirsten over at Once Upon A Spine tagged me in. Go check out her blog, she has some excellent book reviews (even some books that I’ve read!)

According to this Wikipedia page;

The Gibson Girl was the personification of the feminine ideal of physical attractiveness as portrayed by the pen-and-ink illustrations of artist Charles Dana Gibsonduring a 20-year period that spanned the late 19th and early 20th century in the United States and Canada. The artist saw his creation as representing the composite of “thousands of American girls.”

So, even though I am as old as dirt, the Gibson Girl concept was before my time. But not before my grandmother’s time. My dad’s mother did some modeling way back around the turn of the 20th century.

josephine -right- and unkown

A tin-type photograph. Unkown when it was taken, but I would believe 1890 – 1900. My grandmother is on the left.

I have to say that when I found these tintypes (here’s the Wiki page on exactly what a tintype is), I was amazed that that was my grandmother! I had only known her much later in life when she came to live with us. I know my brother and she did not get along. Probably because he was the oldest son, and much more was laid on his shoulders, then on my shoulders as the second son (and 10 years his junior). But I had no problems with Nanny. We got along famously. Especially after about the third time she was upset with me and said: “Just wait until your father gets home”. I was truly scared the first two times. But dad was like “I didn’t see (whatever I did), so you should punish him”. From the third time on, I was like “No problem!”. But then she also told me that if you could sprinkle salt on a birds tail, you would be able to catch the bird. And of course, I believed her. Standard course for a 6-year-old!

josephine campbell -bottom right- and unks

Nanny is the one in the bottom right.

Thanks for taking this trip down memory lane with me. I’d love to see photos or whatever of your family!

Peace,
B

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