Singer-Songwriters

Singer-Songwriters – Chapter Two

Today’s entry is Chester Williams Powers, Jr.  Never heard of him?  Not surprising since he didn’t preform under his birth name.  In fact, he not only used a stage name, Dino Valenti (sometimes Valente), he wrote under a different name, Jesse Oris Farrow.  As confusing as some of my family tree has turned out to be.

So just who is this guy, or maybe it’s “these guys”? 

You would know him best from the psychedelic 60’s and 70’s group Quicksilver Messenger Service.  Their biggest hit was “Fresh Air” which I thought I’ve already linked here on the blog, but I can’t find it.  But that’s okay, since I’m not using that song anyway.

While listening to Earle Bailey on the Deep Tracks channel this morning, he played the song I will use.  He also talked about how Chet (at least that’s what his Wiki page says he calls himself) had the different names.  Naturally, I had to go and check.  The next obvious step was to write this post so I might be able to educate you, my wonderful reader(s).

One thing I did learn was that Chet wrote “Let’s Get Together”, or as it’s more widely known “Get Together”.  I may or may not have already posted Jessie Colin Young and the Youngbloods’ cover of that tune here.  That version made it to number 5 in 1967. 

After an arrest for possession of marijuana, he was searched again by police (who found more marijuana and amphetamines in his apartment) while awaiting trial. He received a one-to-ten-year sentence served in part at Folsom State Prison. To raise money for his defense, he sold the publishing rights for “Get Together” to Frank Werber, the manager of The Kingston Trio.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chet_Powers

This is the title track of the groups fifth album, “What About Me”, released in December 1970.  The song only made it to number 100 in 1971.

Enjoy!

Peace,
B

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Skeeter’s Family

Checking All The (Music) Boxes

This could go under Guitar Gods, Singer – Songwriters, or What’s Stuck In My Head.  This video checks all the good boxes on my theoretical checklists.

First, it’s one of my favorite Eric Clapton tunes that he co-wrote with Bonnie Bramlett, she being the Bonnie in Bonnie and Delany that Eric toured and recorded with.  Second, it has Peter Frampton who I’ve already featured on this here blog.  And lastly, it’s the Doobie Brothers without Michael McDonald.  I have nothing again Michael or his solo music, it’s just during his time with the Doobies, it didn’t come across right to me.  It was almost like the Doobies were his backup band.  But I do miss Jeff “Skunk” Baxter on guitar with the band.  I guess he’s too busy doing defense work now a days.

The song and its accompanying video were recorded virtually, with Frampton and every member of the Doobie Brothers contributing their parts remotely. “Let It Rain” is a perfect choice for the Doobies and Frampton, who add a little extra instrumental oomph — especially when Frampton and Tom Johnston start trading guitar solos — but otherwise remain faithful to the original’s cathartic pop-rock charms.

Johnston tells Rolling Stone how the collaboration came together, saying: “A couple of months ago, Peter and I were going over various tunes after deciding to do a song or video together. I tossed out ‘Let It Rain’ by Eric Clapton and he loved the idea. He’s a phenomenal guitarist and a fan of Clapton’s as am I, so it seemed a great idea to take to the rest of the guys. Peter, Pat, and I took verses and solos and John played some cool pedal steel and helped us put that together with Bill Payne on piano, John Cowan on bass, and Ed Toth on drums. Also Rob Arthur who did all the video work played B3. It was a team effort! We really enjoyed working together on this with Peter.”

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/doobie-brothers-peter-frampton-eric-clapton-let-it-rain-cover-1081180/

Enjoy!

Peace,
B

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Skeeter’s Family

Happy Birthday

Some time ago I posted about a discussion between my brother and myself about who was the greatest American songwriter.  (Part 1 of that discussion is here, and part 2 here).  To sum it up we decided on Paul Simon.  Actually, my brother told me it was Paul Simon, I was holding out for Bob Dylan.  But we both agreed that John Lennon was the greatest songwriter of our era.

Today would have been John’s 80th birthday.

Happy birthday John.

Peace,
B

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Skeeter’s Family