70’s music

Checking All The (Music) Boxes

This could go under Guitar Gods, Singer – Songwriters, or What’s Stuck In My Head.  This video checks all the good boxes on my theoretical checklists.

First, it’s one of my favorite Eric Clapton tunes that he co-wrote with Bonnie Bramlett, she being the Bonnie in Bonnie and Delany that Eric toured and recorded with.  Second, it has Peter Frampton who I’ve already featured on this here blog.  And lastly, it’s the Doobie Brothers without Michael McDonald.  I have nothing again Michael or his solo music, it’s just during his time with the Doobies, it didn’t come across right to me.  It was almost like the Doobies were his backup band.  But I do miss Jeff “Skunk” Baxter on guitar with the band.  I guess he’s too busy doing defense work now a days.

The song and its accompanying video were recorded virtually, with Frampton and every member of the Doobie Brothers contributing their parts remotely. “Let It Rain” is a perfect choice for the Doobies and Frampton, who add a little extra instrumental oomph — especially when Frampton and Tom Johnston start trading guitar solos — but otherwise remain faithful to the original’s cathartic pop-rock charms.

Johnston tells Rolling Stone how the collaboration came together, saying: “A couple of months ago, Peter and I were going over various tunes after deciding to do a song or video together. I tossed out ‘Let It Rain’ by Eric Clapton and he loved the idea. He’s a phenomenal guitarist and a fan of Clapton’s as am I, so it seemed a great idea to take to the rest of the guys. Peter, Pat, and I took verses and solos and John played some cool pedal steel and helped us put that together with Bill Payne on piano, John Cowan on bass, and Ed Toth on drums. Also Rob Arthur who did all the video work played B3. It was a team effort! We really enjoyed working together on this with Peter.”

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/doobie-brothers-peter-frampton-eric-clapton-let-it-rain-cover-1081180/

Enjoy!

Peace,
B

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What’s Stuck In My Head – 19 October

Full the for back story on this go here

But his song does pop into the ol’ brain case now and then. Back in the day I was a fan of CDB. I drifted away from his music for no particular reason, just changing tastes I guess. But this along with The Ballad of the Uneasy Rider are still on my playlist. Even if he does spell Trudie wrong (see the link above).

Charlie was a damn good musician, although his twang distracts from the vocals for me. He could play that fiddle something fierce. I have several big cowboy hats like his. Plus a really nice Stetson my late, great mother-in-law bought me in New Orleans back about 1995.

This video reminds me of The Allman Brothers so much. With the two drummers and dual lead guitars. The song itself isn’t all that complicated, but I can’t play it. I can’t grow a beard that bushy, so I don’t qualify. Guess that means ZZ Top won’t be calling anytime soon either…

Enjoy!

Peace,
B

P.S. I’ve got a new genealogy blog now.  The link is down below!

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What’s Stuck In My Head – 12 October

I know how this one got stuck.

Saturday afternoon while I was do a little genealogy this played on the Classic Vinyl station.  I am very familiar with this song, it is a George Harrison original after all, but not this version.  A quick look at the channel guide showed me it was George and his best pal Eric Clapton.  I immediately brought up YouTube to see if I could find a video.  I did find a video for the two guitar gods playing together, but it didn’t sound quite right.

On the cover I heard, the vocals were really nicely balanced.  George’s lead vocal had more presence than both the original by The Beatles and this live video I had found.  It took a few changes to my search terms, and some scrolling to find at least the proper vocal mix.  If you go to the YouTube page for this song it says it is a 2004 remix of a 1991 concert from Japan.  The bootleg concert video (here) is interesting in seeing the interplay of George with the audience at the beginning, and of course to see Eric play in his usual laid-back style.  They didn’t call him slow hand for nothing.

The album Live In Japan features this track, and Eric also preformed it at the Concert For George tribute concert to Harrison in 2002.

The video I’m using is boring, true.  But I used it because of the superior audio quality.   I hope you enjoy it as much as I!

Enjoy!

Peace,
B

P.S. I’ve got a new genealogy blog now.  The link is down below!

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Skeeter’s Family